Trumpeter Swans in Aurora, Visit To Harry Lumsden’s Pond

Trumpeter Swans in Aurora, Visit To Harry Lumsden’s Pond

Sometimes I see Trumpeter Swans at the McKenzie Marsh and sometimes not. Once I was sitting with Matthew on the bench overlooking the marsh and when I looked up there was a slow flying swan above us.

What a spectacular view that was. Okay just one swan, but still – I never seen a flying swan before. A tip then – don’t ever forget to look up – you will never know what will pass above by you.

Trumpeter Swans, Harry Lumsden's Pond


Trumpeter Swans, Harry Lumsden's Pond


Perhaps I could call Harry Lumsden and ask if I can come and photograph swans at his pond. I discovered about Mr. Lumsden and his connection to Trumpeter Swan restoration program when I read about his Lieutenant Governor’s Ontario Heritage Award for Lifetime Achievement (more than 25 years).

Trumpeter Swans, Harry Lumsden's Pond


I called Mr. Lumsden in May to schedule an appointment. To my surprise he asked me ‘Can you come now?‘. A piece of advice never call for visit around dinner time – you can be surprised as I was. I paused. ‘Can you come tomorrow?‘ – he asked again. ‘Okay, I can‘ – I replied. ‘Well then come anytime tomorrow. See you. Bey.‘ – he replied. ‘Yes I will see you tomorrow‘ – we concluded our short conversation.

Trumpeter Swans, Harry Lumsden's Pond


We arrived next day. That day was a beautiful day – clear blue sky and perfect not over exposed sun light. The green dense trees behind the pond set for the green water background. Reflection was perfect – I couldn’t ask for better light, photographer’s best friend.

Trumpeter Swans, Harry Lumsden's Pond


When we arrived Mr. Lumsden let us in on the property to look around and was back shortly after his first visitor left. He gave I and Matthew a quick tour and told me to get closer to the pond and away from the nets and feeders so I can get good photos of the swans without any obstructions.

Trumpeter Swans, Harry Lumsden's Pond


Taking photos of the swans was quite an experience. We saw one on the nest and few floating around. Mr. Lumsden mentioned that one was missing, probably the one we saw in the Atkinson wetland right across the McKenzie marsh. We also saw a duck with babies, lots of Canada Geese, Blue Jays and Grey Blue Heron flying above.

Trumpeter Swans, Harry Lumsden's Pond


We were also allowed to go and explore trails around the pond. Mr. Lumsden land is like a wildlife park. I really thought that it will be quick in and out visit, but we were there a good forty five minutes.

Trumpeter Swans, Harry Lumsden's Pond


Prior to visit and even now I did some reading about Harry Lumsden’s work. It is quite amazing what he did – including telling us during our visit that he dig all three ponds himself and transform them what can I say – to a swan pond in Aurora.

In some of the reports and newsletters I also came across references to the a movie called Winged Migration, a documentary on the migratory patterns of birds shot over the course of three years on all seven continents. I shall check with our local library in Aurora if they have a copy to watch, sounds like great movie for bird watching enthusiasts.

Trumpeter Swans, Harry Lumsden's Pond


Well not just birds that day. There were also beehives. This was my first time to see and to be that close to the beehive, and see honey bees in action.

Bee Hives, Harry Lumsden's Backyard


That was an amazing adventure seeing larger population of Trumpeter swans, meeting Harry Lumsden and exploring his backyard ponds. I am planning to go back for Doors Open Aurora 2012 and may be I will be able to photograph baby swans (cygnets).


About the Author

Anna Lozyk Romeo

I am living in Aurora and this is my photo journal blog. A picture says 1000 words - but not always, so I write. You don't have to travel 1000 miles to find a treasure - all I have to do is zoom through my lens and I will find it for you here in Aurora.

Comments:

  1. I enjoyed your last post and far be it for me to rain on your parade but everything you mention, except the bees of course, are common sights on St Andrew’s Valley Golf Course.
    The course has a number of large ponds most of which are inter-connected with the East Holland River which meanders throughout the entire course. It is common to see swans, geese, duck,mink,coyote,rabbit,muskrat and all sorts of smaller beasts….plus larger. We have deer seen regularly and even a Horned Owl that took up residence in the blue spruce by the 10th tee which received some local press recently. Racoons and skunk, of course, are as common as anywhere else.
    The golf course provides the three elements for wildlife survival…..water, cover and feed. Unfortunately perhaps the wildlife gets too used to the human presence on the course but this is overcome by by the course’s wildlife policy…….protect it!

  2. Thanks Peter for your comment. Wow all that on the St. Andrew’s Golf Course. I pass by all the time on St. John’s sideroad or via Hamilton park. Definitely abundant in wildlife as you said. Thanks again for sharing. Anna :)